Archive for February, 2012

Posted on 15th February 2012

grow | dill

By MEREDITH KIRTON

Some people only know dill as an insult, yet dill is nothing to hide.  In fact, it’s delicious, both as foliage and as a seed for flavouring.  It is a little difficult to grow, with a tendency in warmer climates to flower then seed prematurely and leave you bitter, less palatable leaves.

The trick is to only sow it from seeds directly into the soil, rather than transplant it from seedling, as the seeds seem to take better, and any transplant shock or stress will trigger it to bolt into bloom.  In summer, so your dill seeds in a partially protect area, as heat stress can also cause it to flower early.

It’s fast too, with a plant going from seed to maturity in about 8 weeks, so stagger your seed sowing by a few months so that you have successive crops of foliage germinating and handy for the kitchen.  Keep feeding with liquid fertiliser every 2-3 weeks, and pinch prune out any flowers as they appear, unless you are wanting the dill seeds.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under grow
Posted on 15th February 2012

harvest | dill

By MANDY SINCLAIR

dill

Storage:

Once picked dill wilts very quickly. Spray lightly with water, wrap in damp kitchen paper then seal in a plastic bag. Refrigerate for up to 5 days.

What to do with glut

  • Preserve

Dill mayonnaise

2 egg yolks
2 tsp lemon juice
100ml olive oil
100ml vegetable oil
2 tbsp chopped dill

1. Place yolks, lemon juice and a pinch of salt into a small food processor. Process until thickened. With motor running add combined oils in a slow thin stream, until mayonnaise is thick and creamy. Add dill and pulse to combine. Taste for seasoning.
Store in an airtight container, refrigerated for up to 1 week.

dill mayonnaise reipe

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 15th February 2012

cook | dill

By MANDY SINCLAIR

Gravlax recipe

Gravlax

½ cup chopped dill, plus 1 tbsp chopped extra
¼ cup sea salt flakes
¼ cup sugar
2 x 250g salmon fillets, skin on, pin boned
crusty bread, capers, to serve
½ cup sour cream

1. Combine dill, salt and sugar. Rub dill mixture all over salmon.
2. Place one piece of salmon, skin side down, on a large piece of plastic wrap. Top with remaining salmon, skin side up. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Place in a shallow dish, top with a chopping board and weigh down with 1-2 cans. Refrigerate for 2 days, turning salmon every 24hrs.
3. Drain salmon and scrape off visible sugar and salt. Thinly slice gravlax. Arrange on a platter with bread and capers. Mix together sour cream and extra dill. Serve with gravlax.

Serves 6

Tip
Tuna can also be cured in the same method.

Try this …….
Dill pickles
Scrub 12 small cucumbers and place in a large saucepan with 250g salt, 4 sprigs of dill, 4 garlic cloves, 1 bay leaf, 1 tsp chilli flakes, ½ tsp black peppercorns and a pinch of dill seeds. Cover with boiling water. Cover with a tightly fitting lid and set aside to cool completely. Transfer to sterilized jars and store for 2 weeks in a cool dark place before opening. Once opened store in the refrigerator.


Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under cook
Posted on 7th February 2012

grow | mango

By MEREDITH KIRTON

mango flower

Most Australians love the taste of mangoes and eagerly await the summer when this fruit comes into season and they become affordable.  What many people don’t realise is, that although they are strictly a tropical fruit, the trees will grow further south and fruit, though not as heavily, as far down the coast as Sydney and Perth.  In fact, once established, trees will even cope with the occasional frost, though fruit set is dependent on temperatures staying warm enough during flowering in spring.

Kensington Pride is probably the most popular variety in the supermarket, however the home gardener should try other types, as these are susceptible to rot, and tend to grow too big (12m tall) whereas ‘Tommy Atkins’ and ‘Irwin’ and smaller cultivars.

Plant your mango tree in an open sunny place, protected from winds and cold.  Ensure the soil is well drained and add lots of organic matter to it to boost the water holding and nutrient storing capacity of your earth. The good news is that they are relatively quick to produce crops, and you should expect to see mangoes from grafted plants after only 3-4 years.  Watch out for fruit fly and scale insects, and anthracnose and black spot.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under grow
Posted on 7th February 2012

harvest | mango

By MANDY SINCLAIR

mangos ripe for harvest

Storage:

Mangoes can be picked under-ripe as they will continue to ripen at room temperature. Once ripe, the skin will have a yellow to reddish blush, will feel slightly soft when touched and the perfume will become more intense. When ripe, mangoes should be stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

What to do with glut

  • Freeze

Cut mango cheeks from the stone and scoop flesh from skin. Place in an airtight container and freeze for up to 3 months. Use in smoothies, margaritas or cakes.

  • Preserve

Mango ice cream

6 frozen mango halves
1/3 cup vanilla yoghurt
1 tbsp honey

Combine frozen mango, yoghurt and honey in a blender. Blend on high speed until smooth and creamy. Scoop into cones to serve if using immediately or pour into an airtight container and freeze until ready to serve.

mango icecream recipe

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 7th February 2012

cook | mango

By MANDY SINCLAIR

Mango cheesecake recipe

Mango cheesecakes

150g butternut snap cookies
60g butter, melted
250g cream cheese, at room temperature
¼ cup caster sugar
90g white chocolate, melted, cooled
½ cup cream, whipped
1 mango, halved, flesh thinly sliced

1 .Place biscuits in a food processor and pulse until fine crumbs. Add butter and pulse to combine. Place 2 tbsp of crumbs into 6 large serving bowls or glasses. Set aside.
2. Using an electric mixer beat cream cheese and sugar together until smooth and creamy. Fold through chocolate and cream.
3. Divide between serving glasses. Top with mango slices. Serve immediately or refrigerate until ready to serve.

Serves 6

Tip
Prepare up to 4 hrs ahead of time and refrigerate until ready to serve.

try this …….
Frozen mango margarita
Place 4 frozen mango halves in a blender. Add ¾ cup margarita mix, ¼ cup tequila and 1 cup of ice. Blend until smooth. Pour into glasses and serve.


Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under cook