Archive for August, 2012

Posted on 13th August 2012

grow | jerusalem artichoke

By MEREDITH KIRTON

how to grow jeruselem artichokes

jeruselem artichoke flwer

Growing these sunflower like plants is so easy the problem is normally not how to grow them but how to control them!  The will thrive in any free draining soil and take frosts, droughts and even partial shade, throwing their flowers 3m to the heavens above most if their neighbours. Native to North America where Indians frequently cultivated them, the tubers are very versatile being able to be eaten cooked or raw.  Plant these out in spring and after they flower in autumn you can dig them up like a potato.  Any tubers left in the ground will reshoot the following spring, or you can store them for replanting in the crisper of your fridge. When planting, make sure you leave some space around them as they can easily overcrowd their neighbours.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , ,

Posted under grow
Posted on 13th August 2012

harvest | jerusalem artichoke

By MANDY SINCLAIR

jerusalem artichikes

Storage:

Store Jerusalem artichokes in a paper bag in a cool dark place for up to 2 weeks. Peel or scrub skin before using, however the Jerusalem artichoke needs to be placed into acidulated water as immediately after being cut or peeled as the cut surface will discolour.

What to do with glut

  • To preserve

pickled artichoke recipe

Pickled Jerusalem artichokes

Juice of 1 lemon
1 kg Jerusalem artichokes
2 cups white vinegar
¾ cup white sugar
1 tsp black mustard seeds
1 tsp black peppercorns
1 tsp salt
½ tsp turmeric
1 onion, halved, sliced
150g cauliflower florets

1. Fill a large bowl with water and add lemon juice. Thickly slice unpeeled Jerusalem artichoke, placing into acidulated water as you go.
2. Place vinegar, sugar, mustard seeds, peppercorns, salt, turmeric and ¾ cup of water in a large saucepan. Bring to boil. Add onion and simmer for 2-3 mins, until onion has softened slightly.
3. Drain chockes and pat dry with paper towel. Pack into sterilized jars with cauliflower. Pour over brine mixture, to cover. Seal. Store in a cool dark place for 1 month before opening. Once opened, refrigerate for up to 1 week.

Jerusalem chips

Preheat oven to 200C or 180C fan. Thinly slice 1kg of un-peeled chokes. Place in a bowl with 2 tbsp olive oil and a pinch of sea salt flakes. Toss to coat. Place on a rack set over a baking tray, in a single layer. Bake for 20 minutse, until golden nd crisp. Cool. Store in an airtight container.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , ,

Posted under harvest
Posted on 13th August 2012

cook | jerusalem artichoke

By MANDY SINCLAIR

jerusalem artichoke bread recipe

Jerusalem artichoke bread

300g Jerusalem artichokes, peeled, chopped, plus 1 extra thinly sliced
¼ cup cream
2 cups self-raising flour, sifted
60g cold butter, chopped
1 tsp finely chopped rosemary, plus extra sprigs for topping
1/3 cup buttermilk, plus 1 tsp extra for brushing
180g fetta, crumbled
butter, to serve (optional)

1. Preheat oven to 220C or 200C fan.  Line a baking tray with baking paper.
2. Cook Jerusalem artichoke in a large pan of boiling salted water for 20-30 mins, until tender. Drain and return to pan. Add cream and mash well. Cool.
3. Place flour and a pinch of salt into a large bowl. Add butter and using fingertips, rub butter into flour until mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add mashed Jerusalem artichoke mixture and chopped rosemary and stir to combine. Make a well in centre. Add buttermilk. Using a flat bladed knife, stir until a dough forms.
4. Turn dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently to form an oval loaf shape. Divide into three equal pieces and roll each piece into a log. Plait the three pieces together and place onto prepared tray. Top with sliced artichoke, rosemary sprigs and fetta, pressing lightly into dough. Brush with extra buttermilk. Bake for 30-40 mins, until hollow sounding when tapped. Break into pieces and serve with butter, if using.

Tip
This is a wet dough and can be a little difficult to handle. If too wet, knead a little more flour into dough before plaiting.

try this …….
Jerusalem artichoke & leek soup
Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large pan on medium. Cook 2 chopped leeks for 2-3 mins, until soft. Add 600g peeled and chopped Jerusalem artichokes, 2 chopped potatoes and 4 cups chicken stock. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low and cook for 20-30 mins, until vegetables are tender. Using a stick blender, blend until smooth.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: ,

Posted under cook
Posted on 13th August 2012

grow | celeriac

By MEREDITH KIRTON

growing celeriac at home

This unusual looking swollen root it a very close cousin of celery, so it’s no surprise that it has a similar flavour to this cooking staple or that it likes similar growing conditions.
The seeds should be sown in spring and planted out late spring early summer for autumn/winter harvests.  They need a well drained position in full sun to taste their best and thrive, and will need about 14 -16 weeks to grow to harvestable size.  Best results are achieved by liquid feeding as well with a soluble organic fertiliser so as liquid blood and bone or seaweed solution.  Space plants about a foot apart and lifts carefully with a fork, trying not to damage this easily discoloured bulb.  Scrub clean and peel before use, and they can be eaten both raw and cooked.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , , ,

Posted under grow
Posted on 13th August 2012

harvest | celeriac

By MANDY SINCLAIR

home grown celeriac from the vegetable garden

Storage:

Store whole, unpeeled celeriac in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks after harvesting. Once cut or peeled, celeriac will begin to discolour, so needs to be dropped into water that has been acidulated with lemon juice or vinegar.

What to do with glut

  • To freeze

celeriac puree

Cook 1kg peeled and chopped celeriac in 2 cups of chicken stock, covered, for about 30 mins, until tender. Drain. Blend celeriac, in batches, until smooth. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator. Heat in a saucepan on low with ½ cup cream, stirring, until warm.

  • To preserve

celeriac recipe

celeriac remoulade

1 small celeriac
1/3 cup whole egg mayonnaise
2 gherkins, finely chopped
2 tbsp baby capers
1 tbsp finely chopped parsley
1 tsp Dijon mustard
Lemon juice, to taste

1.  Fill a bowl with cold water and add juice of 1 lemon. Peel celeriac and cut into a fine julienne, placing into the acidulated water as you go.

2.  Mix together mayonnaise, gherkin, capers, parsley and mustard. Drain celeriac and add to mayonnaise mixture. Season with a little lemon juice and stir to combine. Serve with smoked salmon or trout, grilled chicken or roast beef.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , , , , ,

Posted under harvest
Posted on 13th August 2012

cook | celeriac

By MANDY SINCLAIR

celeriac soup recipe

Celeriac & pancetta soup with chargrilled prawns

1 tbsp olive oil
1 leek, chopped
100g sliced pancetta, chopped
1 celeriac, peeled, diced
1 potato, peeled, chopped
1 litre chicken stock
18 raw prawns, peeled, deveined, tails intact
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to serve
½ tsp chilli flakes
lemon cheeks, to serve

1. Heat oil in a large saucepan on medium. Cook leek for 2-3 mins, until soft. Add pancetta, celeriac and potato. Cook, stirring, for 1-2 mins, until well coated. Add stock. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low, simmer for 20 -30 mins, until soft.
2. Using a stick blender, blend soup until smooth. Season. Reheat on low.
3. Meanwhile, toss together prawns, extra virgin olive oile and chilli. Cook on a preheated chargrill or barbecue for 1-2 mins, until cooked. Ladle soup into bowls. Top with chargrilled prawns, black pepper and drizzle with extra oil.

Serves 6

Tip
Leave out the prawns and top with a dollop of celeriac remoulade.

try this …….
Add chopped celeriac when cooking potato for mash, add to your pumpkin and potato and roast for the next baked dinner, or pan-fry in a little oil to make crispy chips.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , ,

Posted under cook