Posts Tagged ‘beans’

Posted on 1st October 2013

Grow | Green Beans

By MEREDITH KIRTON

 

climbing beans

french beans

Got a fence?  2 metres of beans growing along it could feed your family all summer, and the kids will love going outside with a basket to cut their own greens for dinner, or just nibble on raw beans as they past.  If you can’t find a fence, no probs, you can grow dwarf beans in the garden in rows.

Both runner types and dwarf types can also be grown in tubs too, though obviously the taller varieties will need a tall tripod about 1.8m is ideal, and they are actually very pretty too, with some purple (‘Purple King’ and ‘Purple Queen’), or yellow (‘Bountiful Butter’) podded varieties available. These are all frost tender, and should only be sown after all chance of late cold snaps are gone.

If you live in a colder climate, then Perennial beans, known as runners, can also be grown. These are cut back each autumn then reshoot in spring from their crown.  The two best known ones are ‘Scarlet Runner’, which has beautiful red blooms, and ‘Borlotti’ which has speckled red beds.  These are both the sorts of beans that need slow cooking to be edible, like kidney beans ‘Canellini’.

Whatever you settle on, beans like an enriched soil with lots of added compost to thrive.  They also love regular watering, hate the wind and dislike being overfed, as they actually make their own nitrogen with their specialised roots.  They produce more and more beans the more you pick, so harvest them continually every 4 days or so to keep the plants productive. Be careful not to damage the bush, which is quite easily done, when you harvest by always using a knife of scissors, to reap your bounty.  Sow
seeds when the soil warms up and you’ll be munching away in 10 weeks time.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under grow
Posted on 1st October 2013

Harvest | Green Beans

By MANDY SINCLAIR

french beans

Storage:

Green & yellow beans should be firm, unblemished and smooth. Store refrigerated in a clip lock bag for up to 5 days.

What to do with glut

  • Freeze

Trim ends and blanch beans in a large saucepan of boiling water for 3 mins. Drain and refresh under cold water. Pack into clip-lock bags and freeze for up to 6 weeks.

  • Preserve

Pickled mixed beans

400g green beans, trimmed, blanched
400g yellow beans, trimmed, blanched
4 cups white vinegar
½ cup white sugar
4 garlic cloves, peeled
2 bay leaves
2 small red chillies, chopped
1 tsp black peppercorns
¼ cup olive oil

1. Stand beans upright in sterilized jars, packing tightly.
2. Place vinegar, sugar, garlic, bay leaves, chilli, peppercorns and 4 cups of water in a large saucepan. Bring to boil. Pour over beans to completely cover. Drizzle over a little oil and seal.
3. Turn jars upside down every 30 mins or so, until cool. Store in a cool, dark place for 8 weeks before using. Refrigerate once opened

 

pickeld beans recipe

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 1st October 2013

Cook | Green Beans

By MANDY SINCLAIR

bean sald recipe

Steamed beans with hazelnut & lemon butter

50g butter
175g yellow beans
175g green beans
½ cup hazelnuts, chopped
finely grated rind of 1 lemon

1. Melt butter in a large frying pan on medium heat. Add beans and cook, tossing regularly for 5 mins, until tender. Add hazelnuts and lemon rind and cook for another 2 mins.
2. Serve with grilled meat or chicken

Serves 4

Tip…
Use any variety of beans you prefer, butter, green, flat beans or broad beans.

Try This…
Bean, beetroot and goats cheese salad.
Blanch 200g green beans and cut into 4cm lengths. Arrange on a platter with 100g baby rocket, drained 400g can baby beets and 100g crumbled goats cheese. Drizzle over 2 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil and season well.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under cook
Posted on 1st August 2011

grow | broadbeans

By MEREDITH KIRTON

Broad beans

Growing Broadbeans

Broad Beans (Vicia faba), are one of the most useful winter vegetables, especially in frosty areas as they as very cold tolerant. Sown directly in rills in the soil 20cm apart, they grow between 60cm and a 1m depending on the variety over a 20 week period and are heavy yielding hardy.  They don’t need staking as such, but a frame on stake cage will give them the support they need, and wind breaks will also help as they can be easily
snapped in two.

Broad beans need a well draining soil, but will produce their own nitrogen, so addding nitrogen based fertiliser is unnecessary.  In fact, at the end of the season you can dig the plants back into the soil as they are a rich green manure and will help build up the soil in your patch.

There are a few types with pods available with either white or green seeds, and Windsors, which have round pods, are sweeter again, white or green.  There is also a red flowered broad bean called ‘Crimson’ which still produces beans.  The tender young pods are best, and older beans may
need to be double shelled (second time after blanching in boiling water) to be palatable.  New shoots also are edible and have a delicate broad bean flavour perfect for tossing through pasta, adding to salads or garnishing.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under grow
Posted on 1st August 2011

harvest | broadbeans

By MANDY SINCLAIR

broadbeans

Storage:
Once picked, place whole broad beans in a paper bag and refrigerate for up to 1 week.
Compared to the weight of the whole bean the yield is quite small. Once podded, 200g of whole beans will give approximately 80g.

What to do with glut

  • Freeze

Podded broad beans freeze very well. Place in an airtight container or plastic bag and freeze until ready to use. Cook beans straight from the freezer in a large pan of boiling water. Drain and peel outer skin from bean to reveal a bright green, tender inner.

  • To dry

Leave the whole beans on the vine until shell is brown and dry. Pick beans and remove pod, the beans should be brown-green colour and smaller in size than freshly podded broad beans. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 months. To use, soak in water overnight before boiling in salted water until tender.

  • To preserve

Broad bean puree

1.2kg whole broad beans or 500g shelled
3 garlic cloves, crushed
1tsp ground cumin
1tsp ground coriander
½ cup extra virgin olive oil

1. Cook shelled beans in a pan of boiling salted water for 10 mins, until tender. Drain, reserving 1 cup of cooking liquid. Peel beans, discard skins.
2. Place beans, garlic, cumin, coriander and ½ cup of reserved liquid in a food processor. Process until smooth, adding more liquid if needed. Fill sterilized jars and refrigerate for up to 1 week or place in an airtight container and freeze for up to 2 months.

Use as a dip topped with sumac and served with pita crisps. Spread onto bruschetta, top with a little grated parmesan and gill until golden. Stir through hot pasta and serve with shaved parmesan.

Makes 2 cups

Broadbean puree recipe

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 1st August 2011

cook | broadbeans

By MANDY SINCLAIR

broadbean recipe

Broad bean, pancetta & pine nut fettucine

500g broad beans, shelled
400g fettucine
1 tbsp olive oil
2 eschallots, chopped
100g sliced pancetta, chopped
2 tbsp pine nuts
¾ cup thickened cream
1/3 cup grated parmesan

1. Cook broad beans in a pan of boiling salted water for 5 mins. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking liquid. Peel beans, discard skins.
2. Cook fettucine in a large pan of boiling salted water according to packet directions. Drain.

3. Meanwhile, heat oil in a frying pan on medium. Cook eschalot for 2-3 mins, until soft. Add pancetta and pine nuts. Cook stirring, for 3-4 mins, until pancetta is crisp. Add broad beans, cream, reserved cooking liquid and parmesan. Simmer for 5 mins, stirring until thickened slightly. Add fettucine and toss to combine.

Serves 4

try this ….
Broad bean, garlic and chilli salad
Cook 300g podded broad beans in a pan of boiling water for 5 mins. Drain and rinse under cold water. Peel beans, discard skins. Place in a bowl with 100g baby rocket and 1 punnet halved cherry tomatoes. Mix together ¼ cup olive oil, 1 tbsp white wine vinegar, 1 finely chopped small red chilli and 1 crushed garlic cloves. Pour over salad and toss to combine.


Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under cook
Posted on 14th December 2010

grow | beans

By MEREDITH KIRTON

growing beans on a trellis

Got a fence?  2 metres of beans growing along it could feed your family all summer, and the kids will love going outside with a basket to cut their own greens for dinner, or just nibble on raw beans as they past.  If you can’t find a fence, no probs, you can grow dwarf beans in the garden in rows.

Both runner types and dwarf types can also be grown in tubs too, though obviously the taller varieties will need a tall tripod about 1.8m is ideal, and they are actually very pretty too, with some purple (‘Purple King’ and ‘Purple Queen’), or yellow (‘Bountiful Butter’) podded varieties available. These are all frost tender, and should only be sown after all chance of late cold snaps are gone.

If you live in a colder climate, then Perennial beans, known as runners, can also be grown. These are cut back each autumn then reshoot in spring from their crown.  The two best known ones are ‘Scarlet Runner’, which has beautiful red blooms, and ‘Borlotti’ which has speckled red beds.  These are both the sorts of beans that need slow cooking to be edible, like kidney beans ‘Canellini’.

Whatever you settle on, beans like an enriched soil with lots of added compost to thrive.  They also love regular watering, hate the wind and dislike being overfed, as they will actually make their own nitrogen fertiliser with their specialised roots.  They produce more and more beans the more you pick, so harvest them continually every 4 days of so to keep the plants productive, and be careful not to damage the bush, which is quite easily done, when you harvest by always using a knife of scissors, to reap your bounty.  Sow seeds now, and you’ll be munching away in 10 weeks time.

baby bean

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , , ,

Posted under grow