Posts Tagged ‘freezing’

Posted on 6th February 2014

Harvest | Asian Greens

By MANDY SINCLAIR

 Asian Greens from the garden

Storage:

The most common varieties under the umbrella of Asian Greens are pak choy, choy sum, gai larn and baby bok choy. Due to the naturally high water content of Asian greens they generally don’t store well, and are best picked at the time of using. If storing is absolutely necessary, pack in a perforated plastic bag and refrigerate for 1-2 days.

What to do with glut

  • Wilt, chop, freeze

Place greens in a large strainer and pour over a kettle over boiling water. Refresh under cold water and drain well. Transfer to a clean tea towel and pat dry. Pack into airtight containers or clip lock bags and freeze for up to 2 months.

freezing asian greens

  • To Preserve

Pickled greens

 Using your choice of greens, separate any leaves and cut leaves and stems into 4cm lengths. Place into an airtight container. Heat 1 cup rice wine vinegar, ½ cup white sugar and 1 tbsp shredded ginger in a pan on low, stirring, until sugar has dissolved. Bring to boil. Remove from heat and immediately pour over vegetables. Toss to combine. Seal and refrigerate overnight before using. Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

 

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

 

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 20th December 2013

Harvest | Kiwi Fruit

By MANDY SINCLAIR

kiwi fruit

Storage:

Pick kiwi fruit whilst still firm and under ripe. Store in the refrigerator for up to 5 weeks. To ripen, store at room temperature for 1-2 days until the fruit gives slightly, when touched.

What to do with glut

  • Freeze

Kiwi choc pops

Peel kiwi fruit and cut into 2cm thick slices. Push a paddle pop stick into the sides of each slice. Place on a tray and freeze until firm. Melt 1 cup dark chocolate. Set aside to cool. Dip each frozen kiwi piece into chocolate, allowing excess to drip off. Freeze until ready to serve.

  • Preserve

Kiwi fruit jam

1 kg kiwi fruit, peeled, chopped
½ cup orange juice
3 cups caster sugar

1. Place a small saucer in the freezer.
2. Place kiwi fruit, water and orange juice in a large saucepan. Boil for 5 mins, until fruit has softened. Remove from heat. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Boil for 40 mins.
3. To test for setting. Remove jam from heat. Drop 1 tsp of jam onto cold saucer. Leave for 30 secs to cool. Setting point is reached if the surface wrinkles when touched and a channel is formed by a finger, remains open. If not, boil for another 10 mins, before testing again.
4. Transfer to sterilized jars and seal immediately. Store in a cool dark place until opening, then refrigerate.

Makes about 4 cups

kiwi fruit jam recipe

  • Dry

Preheat oven to 140C or 120C fan. Line baking trays with baking paper.
Fill a bowl with water and add the juice of 2 lemons. Peel kiwi fruit and cut into 1cm thick slices. Dip into acidulated water to prevent discolouration. Lay kiwi fruit in a single layer, on prepared trays. Bake for 4 hrs, turning after 2 hrs, until dry. The fruit should not be crisp dry but soft and pliable. Cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 1st November 2013

Harvest | Macadamias

By MANDY SINCLAIR

macadamia nuts

Storage:

Store macadamias in the shell in an airtight container, in a dark place, for up to 3 months. Once shelled, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer for up to 1 month..

What to do with glut

macadamia nuts toasted, roasted and ground

  • Toast

Cook macadamias in a dry frying pan on medium heat, swirling occasionally, for 2-3 mins, until golden. Remove from pan and set aside to cool.

  • Roast

 Preheat oven to 180C or 160C fan. Place macadamias on a baking tray and bake for 5-7 mins, until golden. Cool.

Toasted/ Roasted macadamias can be store in an airtight container in the pantry for up to 1 week, or refrigerated for up to 1 month.

  • Grind

 Place toasted nuts in a small food processor and pulse until ground.

  • Freeze

 Macadamias can be frozen roasted or un-roasted, however the richness of  flavour is compromised slightly when stored this way. Pack in an airtight container or clip lock bag and freeze for up to 1 month.

 

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 20th October 2013

Harvest | Avocado

By MANDY SINCLAIR

avocados

  • Storage

Avocados don’t fully ripen until they are picked from the tree. Store at room temperature for about 3-5 days, they are ripe when the skin ‘gives’ slightly when lightly pressed.

  • What to do with glut

Freeze
Avocado flesh freezes quite well, although the texture changes once defrosted. Once thawed they are ideal to use for guacamole, soups and pates. Peel avocado, remove stones and rub flesh with a cut lemon. Pack into clip lock bags and freeze for up to 1 month. Thaw in the refrigerator and use immediately.

freezing avocados

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 23rd September 2013

Harvest | Onions

By MANDY SINCLAIR

onions harvest

Storage:

Store eschalots and brown and white skinned onions loose, in a dark cool place for up to 1 month.
Chives and spring onions however should be picked as needed. In case of a glut, they can be stored in a clip lock bag, refrigerated, for up to 1 week.

What to do with glut

  • Freeze

Onions can be frozen once peeled and sliced, however due to the high water content they will be very soft once thawed. Thaw in a strainer, discarding juice. Frozen onions are ideal for cooking on the barbecue, however the time it takes to caramelize and cook through will double.

  • Preserve

Pickled spring onions

1kg small onions or eschalots
1/3 cup salt
4 cups brown vinegar
1 cup caster sugar
2 tbsp mustard seeds
1 tsp peppercorns
4 rosemary sprigs

1 .Place unpeeled onions in a large bowl. Cover with boiling water and set aside for 5 mins to soften skins. Drain and peel onions. Place peeled onions in a bowl with salt and toss to coat. Add enough cold water to cover and set aside for 24 hrs. Drain, rinse well and pat dry.

2. Place vinegar, sugar, mustard seeds, peppercorns and rosemary sprigs in a saucepan. Heat on high, stirring, until sugar dissolves. Place onions in sterilized jars and pour over enough vinegar mixture to cover onion. Seal and store in a cool dark place for 2 weeks before using. Use within 1 month and refrigerate after opened.

pickeld onion recipe

 

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 21st August 2013

Harvest | Kumera

By MANDY SINCLAIR

 kumera harvest

Storage:

Generally speaking the natural sweetness of Kumera isn’t evident when first harvested and needs to be stored in a cool dark place for 2 weeks to allow the sugars to develop. If not using immediately after this time, store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

What to do with glut

  • To Freeze
    Cook kumera in a pan of boiling salted water until tender. Drain and return to pan. Add a little butter and mash until smooth. Set aside to cool. Transfer to airtight containers or fill ice cube trays and freeze for up to 1 month.

Kumera & bacon soup

1 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
175g bacon, rind removed, chopped
2 tsp curry powder
1kg kumera, peeled, chopped
1 litre chicken stock
Sour cream, snipped chives, to serve

1. Heat oil in a large saucepan on medium. Cook onion for 5 mins, until softened. Add bacon and cook for 2-3 mins, until brown. Add curry powder and cook for 30 secs, until fragrant. Add kumera and stir to coat.
2. Add stock and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, for 15 mins, until tender. Remove from heat. Using a hand blender, blend soup until smooth. Cool completely. Transfer to airtight containers and freeze until ready to use.
3. Thaw in the refrigerator. Heat soup in a saucepan on low, stirring until hot. Serve topped with a dollop of sour cream and chives.

Serves 8

kumera soup recipe

  • To Dry

Wash kumera, pat dry and peel. Cut in to 5mm  slices and steam or cook in the microwave until just tender. Pat dry again. Lay on a wire rack placed over a large tray, in a single layer. Preheat oven to 80C or 60C fan. Dry kumera for up to 8 hrs, checking every 2 hrs, until dry.
Alternatively grate kumera and dry as above. The dried kumera can be ground into a powder and used in baking or pancake batters.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

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Posted under harvest
Posted on 3rd April 2013

harvest | vine leaves / grapes

By MANDY SINCLAIR

 grapes and grape vine leaves

Storage:

Generally speaking the longer grapes stay on the vine the sweeter they will be. Harvest bunches of grapes and store unwashed in a plastic bag refrigerated for up to 1 week. When ready to serve, wash and pat dry.

Grape leaves should be picked whole, without any holes and must not have been sprayed with pesticides. Choose the pale green supple leaves just below the new growth but above the bunches of grapes.

What to do with glut

  • Freeze

Pick, wash and pat dry grapes. Pack into small clip lock bags and freeze for up to 1 month. Ideal for lunchboxes, to use in punch or cocktails.

  • To Preserve

Grape juice

Grape juice

Pick 1kg of grapes from stems and place in a large bowl of water. Rinse well, discarding any overripe or wrinkled grapes.
Drain and place in a large saucepan. Using a potato masher, mash well, until grapes are squashed and juicy. Heat on low, until simmering. Simmer for 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Mash again, squashing any remaining grapes that are whole.
Pour grape mixture into a fine sieve set over a large bowl. Set aside overnight in the refrigerator, to strain.
There will be a little sediment in the juice, if you prefer a clearer juice, strain again. Serve as is or dilute a little with sparkling mineral water.

grape vine leaves fro brining recipe

Brining vine leaves

Wash vine leaves under running water and cut away stems. Blanch in a pan of boiling water for 1-2 mins, until wilted. Drain and refresh under cold water. Drain and pat dry.
Heat 6 cups of water and 250g of salt, stirring, until salt dissolves. Set aside to cool. Lay leaves in a sterilised jar, stacking on top of each other. Cover with brine and a square of baking paper, ensuring leaves are submersed in brine. Seal and set aside for 2 months.
To use the leaves, remove from brine and rinse under water. Use for dolmades.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

 

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Posted under harvest