Posts Tagged ‘nuts’

Posted on 1st November 2013

Grow | Macadamias

By MEREDITH KIRTON

macadamias ripening on tree

Macadamias are the most successful ‘bush tucker’ export from Australia, with the oil-rich nuts being used in both sweet and savoury cooking. The two main species of macadamia are Macadamia tetraphylla (rough-shelled) and M. integrifolia (smooth-shelled), which include a pink-flowering type that is rather pretty.

Macadamias are best grown from grafted stock, as they will then fruit after about 5 years. They need a frost-free, open, sunny position, but one that is protected from strong, hot winds. They require rich, fertile soil and you ned to feed young trees every 2 weeks with seaweed solution or worm wee (worm tea). Once they are bearing size, mulch the plants with lucerne hay to keep them gently fed. Allow about 10 m (33 ft) for your tree to spread out. Encourage beneficial insects into your garden and bees to help pollinate the flowers and keep your macadamia trees disease free.

The nuts are easily picked up off the ground to harvest, but they are a harder nut to crack than most!  Dogs and rats seem to love them, and will get them off the ground if you don’t.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , ,

Posted under grow
Posted on 1st November 2013

Harvest | Macadamias

By MANDY SINCLAIR

macadamia nuts

Storage:

Store macadamias in the shell in an airtight container, in a dark place, for up to 3 months. Once shelled, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer for up to 1 month..

What to do with glut

macadamia nuts toasted, roasted and ground

  • Toast

Cook macadamias in a dry frying pan on medium heat, swirling occasionally, for 2-3 mins, until golden. Remove from pan and set aside to cool.

  • Roast

 Preheat oven to 180C or 160C fan. Place macadamias on a baking tray and bake for 5-7 mins, until golden. Cool.

Toasted/ Roasted macadamias can be store in an airtight container in the pantry for up to 1 week, or refrigerated for up to 1 month.

  • Grind

 Place toasted nuts in a small food processor and pulse until ground.

  • Freeze

 Macadamias can be frozen roasted or un-roasted, however the richness of  flavour is compromised slightly when stored this way. Pack in an airtight container or clip lock bag and freeze for up to 1 month.

 

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , , ,

Posted under harvest
Posted on 1st November 2013

Cook | Macadamias

By MANDY SINCLAIR

caramel macadamia slice recipe

Caramel macadamia slice

1 egg
½ cup caster sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
2/3 cup plain flour
¼ cup self-raising flour
macadamia topping
1 cup brown sugar
200g butter
2 tbsp golden syrup
250g unsalted macadamia nuts, roughly chopped

1. Preheat oven to 180°C or 160°C fan. Grease and line a 18cm x 26cm slice pan
2. Using an electric mixer, beat egg and sugar together until thick and pale. Add oil and beat until well combined. Fold in combined, sifted flours. Spoon into prepared pan and pat out with your hands to cover base evenly. Bake for 15-20 mins, until puffed and golden.
3. Meanwhile, prepare Topping. Place brown sugar, butter and golden syrup in a heavy-based saucepan on low heat. Stir for 2-3 mins, until butter melts and sugar has dissolved. Simmer, without stirring, for 5 mins, until caramelized. Add macadamia nuts.
4. Pour macadamia mixture over base and working quickly, spread evenly. Bake for 10-12 mins, until topping is golden. Cool in pan for 10 mins, until just warm. Cut into squares and leave to cool completely in pan. Remove from pan and store in an airtight container.

Serves  12

Tip…
Cut slice into squares whilst still warm, as the caramel will set on cooling, making it more difficult to cut into even pieces.

Try This…
Macadamia crusted chicken
Cut 2 chicken breast fillets into thick strips. Place 1/3 cup plain flour in one shallow dish, 2 lightly beaten eggs in another and 2 cups ground macadamias and 1 cup fresh breadcrumbs in another. Dip chicken pieces in flour, then egg and finally macadamia mixture, pressing to coat all over. Heat 2 tbsp olive oil in a non-stick frying pan on medium. Cook chicken, in batches, for 2-3 mins each side until golden and cooked through.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , , , ,

Posted under cook
Posted on 17th May 2012

grow | hazelnuts

By MEREDITH KIRTON

Hazelnut flowers

Hazelnut leaves on tree

Hazelnuts are perfect for those with small gardens as the bush only grows about 3m x 3m.
It is a deciduous shrub that does best where cooler winters give it the cold snap it needs for fruiting, but cropping will be better if more than one type of hazelnut is planted so that they can cross pollinate. Catkins from male and female flowers form on the same plant in summer, and, provided pollination occurs, these develop into the sweet kernel everyone loves during autumn.
Plant hazelnuts in an open, sunny position with added humus and mulch well with leaf mould to keep roots cool and moist. Leaves turn quite a pretty yellow before dropping, and there is an ornamental purple foliage form too.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , ,

Posted under grow
Posted on 17th May 2012

harvest | hazelnuts

By MANDY SINCLAIR

Hazel nuts

hazelnuts

Storage:

Hazelnuts stay fresher for longer whilst still in the shell. Once shelled, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer.

What to do with glut

  • To toast and peel

Place hazelnuts on a baking tray. Bake at 180C for 5-8 mins, until brown. Transfer to a clean tea towel, wrap up hazelnuts and while still hot, rub to remove skins. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks once peeled.

Hazelnut praline

Line a baking tray with baking paper.
Heat ½ cup caster sugar and 1 tbsp water in a saucepan on low, until sugar is completely dissolved. Simmer, without stirring, for 2-5 mins, until golden caramel. Add 1 cup toasted chopped hazelnuts and stir until well coated. Immediately pour onto prepared tray. Cool completely until firm. Break into pieces or pound with a rolling pin for a finer texture.

hazelnut praline recipe

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , ,

Posted under harvest
Posted on 17th May 2012

cook | hazelnuts

By MANDY SINCLAIR

Blueberry and hazelnut cake recipe

Blueberry & hazelnut cake

1¼ cup plain flour
1 cup caster sugar
¾ cup ground hazelnuts
2½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp ground cinnamon
finely grated rind of 1 lemon
2 x 125g punnets blueberries
¾ cup milk
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla essence
hazelnut topping
½ cup hazelnuts, chopped
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cup plain flour
1 tbsp vegetable oil

1. Preheat oven to 190C or 170C fan. Grease a 23cm springform pan.
2. Sift flour, sugar, ground hazelnuts, baking powder and cinnamon into a large bowl. Add lemon rind and 1 punnet of blueberries. Toss to combine. Whisk together milk, oil, egg and vanilla. Add to dry ingredients and mix until just combined. Fill prepared pan.
3. To make topping, mix together hazelnuts, brown sugar and flour. Scatter topping and remaining blueberries over cake batter. Drizzle with oil. Bake for 50-55 mins, until a skewer inserted comes out clean.

Serves 12

Tip
r
eplace hazelnuts with pecans, almonds or macadamia nuts.

try this …….
…add toasted hazelnuts to salads, chocolate cake and brownies.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , ,

Posted under cook
Posted on 1st April 2011

grow | almonds

By MEREDITH KIRTON

almonds growing on tree

Middle eastern and Mediterranean countries have long loved the almond, but Australia does have some fine areas for growing our own nuts, like the Adelaide Hills and Riverina.  In fact, almonds just like mild winters, no severe spring frosts, which damage developing kernels, and warm, dry summers and humidity and water logging can be a problem.  Water requirements are minimal compared to many fruit trees, and they are drought resistant once established.

Growing to about 6m in height and width, the tree is ideal for the backyard, but does need to either be one of the self pollinating types, or planted with another variety to cross with and make sure bees are about to do their work!

Depending on your taste and microclimate, almonds are either picked in January/ February, when they are young and bitter, or in March/April, when the kernel is sweeter.  Simply spread out a sheet, knock the nuts off the tree and gather up the sheet and your crop.  Peel off the flesh and the nut lays inside.

Photography by SUE STUBBS | Blog designed by RED PEPPER GRAPHICS

Tags: , ,

Posted under grow